Healthcare Delivery Innovation Needs to Happen Faster


I was recently asked to chair a panel and moderate a roundtable at the upcoming 2015 State Healthcare IT Connect Summit in Baltimore, MD on March 23th and 24th.

I am hosting a roundtable entitled Turning Insight into Action with Patient-Centered Care Management on Monday the 23rd at 1:00pm … and the panel is entitled Community Analytics, Care Coordination and Managing Complex Conditions takes place on Tuesday the 24th at 10:10am. I will be joined by an impressive list of State IT Executives for the panel and we will all be sharing our respective points of view. Judging from the attendee list, this is shaping up to be a terrific conference.

As I started to prepare for these sessions it started to bother me that this transformation (using analytics to enable better care delivery) is taking too long. Not enough organizations are aggressively embracing this model despite the types of outcomes that are now within our reach.

It’s been over four years since Doctor Atul Gawande opened everyone’s eyes to the power of combining community (social) data with clinical data to identify which patients are the most in need of care.   In case you were lost in Antartica, that New Yorker Article The Hot Spotters was groundbreaking. It opened our eyes to the value of non-clinical sources and types of information. As an example, if you are trying to reduce infant mortality, it would certainly be handy to analyze which infants live in buildings that still have lead paint.

It goes without saying … that the sooner you figure out who is in the most need, you can intervene to get the best possible outcome. This might seem simple but the real magic comes from combining different types (structured, unstructured) and sources of data (clinical, social programs, environmental) that can unlock new and powerful insights.

In her recent book The American Health Care Paradox: Why Spending More is Getting Us Less, Dr. Elizabeth H. Bradley from Yale University asserts that when you combine social services spending with healthcare spending you can achieve more. Unlike the rest of the world, the United States archaic division of health and social services is hurting our outcomes. The book offers a unique and fresh perspective on the problems the Affordable Care Act won’t solve. She also asserts that 60% of outcomes can be attributed to social, environmental and behavioral.

At IBM, we have seen similar eye-popping results when combining different types and sources information. I have blogged about some of these examples:

I plan to talk about these examples, and more, at the conference. As we talk to State healthcare officials, it seems while almost everyone is embracing some flavor of analytics and care management … many seem to assume they only have limited access to data though, usually claims data.

It’s time to start thinking outside of the box. State governments are in a unique position. Tthey have access to unique sets of data (social programs, environmental, safety, crime, others), that when combined, can deliver the kind of outcomes that Dr. Gawande was talking about over four years ago. The extra effort required to collaborate and share data is well worth the opportunity to achieve these types of outcomes.

I hope to see you at the upcoming 2015 State Healthcare IT Connect Summit in Baltimore, MD on March 23th and 24th.

One thought on “Healthcare Delivery Innovation Needs to Happen Faster

  1. Pingback: Have Your Started Your Data Expedition Yet? | The Intrapreneurist

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