Content in Motion: The Voice of Your Customer

Do you listen to your customers?

No, really!  Of course, everyone answers “yes” when asked this question.  So much so … that the question really isn’t worth asking anymore.  The real question to ask is “What are you doing about it?”

Your customers write about your services, prices, product quality and their experiences with you in social media.  They write you letters (yes, letters on paper do exist), they send you emails, they call your call centers and even participate in surveys you conduct … Again I ask, what are you doing about it?

How are you translating all that information across all those input channels into action?  All of that content (you already have) in the form of customer interactions is just waiting to be leveraged (hhmmmm).

In three separate “C” Level studies (CIO, CFO, CEO) … the number one executive imperative was to “Reinvent Customer Relationships”.  Across the three studies, key findings were to:

  • Get closer to customers (top need)
  • Better understand what customers need
  • Deliver unprecedented customer service

Can anyone think of a better way to accomplish this then by examining all of that customer interaction based content to enable you to do something about it?  I bet there are loads of trends, patterns and new insights just waiting to be explored and discovered in those interactions … something demanding your attention and needing action.  This is one of the thoughts I had in mind when I blogged about “Content at Rest or Content in Motion? Which is Better?” a few weeks ago.  Clearly, identifying customer satisfaction trends about products, services and personnel is critical to any business.

The Hertz Corporation is doing this today.  They are using IBM Content Analytics software to examine customer interaction based content to better identify car and equipment rental performance levels for pinpointing and making the necessary adjustments to improve customer satisfaction levels.  Insights derived from enterprise content enable companies like Hertz to drive new marketing campaigns or modify their products and services to meet the demands of their customers.

“Hertz gathers an amazing amount of customer insight daily, including thousands of comments from web surveys, emails and text messages. We wanted to leverage this insight at both the strategic level and the local level to drive operational improvements,” said Joe Eckroth, Chief Information Officer, the Hertz Corporation.

Hertz isn’t just listening … they are taking action … by putting their content in motion.

Again I ask, what are you doing about it?  Why not test drive Hertz’s idea in your business?  You’ve already got the content to do so.

I welcome your input as always.  I recently bylined articles on Hertz and IBM Content Analytics for ibm.com and CIO.com entitled  “Insights into Action – Improving Service by Listening to the Voices of your Customers”.  For a more detailed profile on ICA at Hertz visit: http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/32859.wss

IBM … 100 Years Later

Nearly all the companies our grandparents admired have disappeared.  Of the top 25 industrial corporations in the United States in 1900, only two remained on that list at the start of the 1960s.  And of the top 25 companies on the Fortune 500 in 1961, only six remain there today.  Some of the leaders of those companies that vanished were dealt a hand of bad luck.  Others made poor choices. But the demise of most came about because they were unable simultaneously to manage their business of the day and to build their business of tomorrow.

IBM was founded in 1911 as the Computing Tabulating Recording Corporation through a merger of four companies: the Tabulating Machine Company, the International Time Recording Company, the Computing Scale Corporation, and the Bundy Manufacturing Company.  CTR adopted the name International Business Machines in 1924.  The distinctive culture and product branding has given IBM the nickname Big Blue.

As you read this, IBM begins its 101st year.  As I look back at the last century, there is a path that led us to this remarkable anniversary which has been both rich and diverse.  The innovations IBM has contributed includes products ranging from cheese slicers to calculators to punch cards – all the way up to game-changing systems like Watson.

But what stands out to me is what has remained unchanged.  IBM has always been a company of brilliant problem-solvers.  IBMers use technology to solve business problems.  We invent it, we apply it to complex challenges, and we redefine industries along the way.

This has led to some truly game-changing innovation.  Just look at industries like retail, air travel, and government.  Where would we be without UPC codes, credit cards and ATM machines, SABRE, or Social Security?  Visit the IBM Centennial site to see profiles on 100 years of innovation.

We haven’t always been right though … remember OS/2, the PCjr and Prodigy?

100 years later, we’re still tackling the world’s most pressing problems.  It’s incredibly exciting to think about the ways we can apply today’s innovation – new information based systems leveraging analytics to create new solutions, like Watson – to fulfill the promise of a Smarter Planet through smarter traffic, water, energy, and healthcare.  This promise of the future … is incredibly exciting and I look forward to helping IBM pave the way for continued innovation.

Watch the IBM Centennial film “Wild Ducks” or read the book.  IBM officially released a book last week celebrating the Centennial, “Making the World Work Better: The Ideas that Shaped a Century and a Company”.  The book consists of three original essays by leading journalists. They explore how IBM” has pioneered the science of information, helped reinvent the modern corporation and changed the way the world actually works.

As for me … I’ve been with IBM since the 2006 acquisition of FileNet and am proud to be associated with such an innovative and remarkable company.