Adding Storage or Enforcing Retention: The Debate is Over

I did a joint webcast this week with InformationWeek on strategies to deal with information overload (which made me feel guilty about my recent lull in blogging).  On the webcast we conducted a quick poll and I was fascinated by the results.  The poll consisted of two questions:

The first question was …

What is your organization’s current, primary strategy for dealing with its information overload?

The choices and audience responses were:

  1. Adding more storage  35.2%
  2. Developing new enterprise retention policies to address information growth  29.6%
  3. Enforcing enterprise retention policies more vigorously  9.3%
  4. Don’t know  25.9%

The second question was the same except asked in a future tense:

What is your organization’s future, primary strategy for dealing with its information overload?

It had the same choices but far different audience responses:

  1. Adding more storage  19.1%
  2. Developing new enterprise retention policies to address information growth  29.8%
  3. Enforcing enterprise retention policies more vigorously  25.5%
  4. Don’t know  25.5%

Holy smokes Batman! … I think we are coming out of the dark ages.  Keep in mind that InformationWeek serves an IT centric audience and generally not the RIM or Legal stakeholders who are already passionate about retention and disposition of records and information.  From this survey data I concluded the following from this IT centric audience:

  • 29.6% already developing retention policies today in addition to those that already have them – this is progress.
  • Adding storage as a primary strategy will decrease from 35.2% to 19.2%this is amazing … and may be the first time “adding storage” wasn’t the automatic answer.
  • Enforcing retention as a primary strategy will increase from 9.3% to 25.5%IT professionals clearly understand that enforcing retention is “the” answer to controlling information growth, see Spring Cleaning for Information and How Long Do I Keep Information?
  • 55.3% will develop or enforce retention policies as a primary strategy in the future – more than 3 times now prefer this to adding storage.
  • Developing and enforcing retention policies is now the clear choice for a primary strategy to address information overload and growth over simply adding storage.

This isn’t the only data that supports this of course.  According to Osterman Research, 70% of organizations share the same concern.  A number of related resources can be found at http://tinyurl.com/2fayjwf including a webinar from Osterman and others.

Here is the replay link to the information overload webinar Content Assessment: The Critical First Steps to Gaining Control that serves as the backdrop for this posting … I hope you check it out.

In any case, rejoice with me … Ding Dong the Witch is Dead !

Developing and enforcing retention policies is now the clear choice and current primary strategy over simply adding storage by all stakeholders … IT, Legal and RIM.  Are you seeing the same change in thought and action in your organization?  Let me know by sharing your thoughts.